Women’s History Month 2017 on Instagram

For live updates, follow us on Instagram and Twitter!

 

Venezuelan filmmaker Margot Benacerraf's documentary ARAYA shared the Cannes International Critics Prize in 1959. More recently, Roger Ebert gave the film the following review: "This astonishing documentary, so beautiful, so horrifying, was filmed in the late 1950s, when an old way of life had not yet ended. It was the belief of the filmmaker, Margot Benacerraf, that the motions of the salt workers became ritualized over the decades, passed down through the generations, and that here we could see the outcome of the endless repeating of arduous tasks that would destroy others." #WomensHistoryMonth #52FilmsByWomen #Venezuela #Araya #fifties #rogerebert #margobenacerraf #saltmines #whm #documentary #classicfilm #venezuelanfilm #MesDeLaHistoriaDeLaMujer #womeninfilm #womendirect #trailblazer

A post shared by Women In Film Los Angeles (@womeninfilmla) on

“Feels like news, like a bulletin from a vital and as-yet-unexplored dimension of reality… This movie is fascinating — a puzzle and a marvel, eliciting wonder and provoking questions.” —A.O. Scottt, @nytimes on Kathleen Collins' LOSING GROUND (depicted) Playwright and activist Kathleen Collins directed LOSING GROUND in 1982. Her work centered Black women "as human subjects and not as mere race subjects." She died of breast cancer at age 46, just four years later. Today we think about what she might have created in another world. #52filmsbywomen #eighties #kathleencollins #rip #rest #womeninfilm #womendirect #losingground #nytimes #womeninmedia #blm #blacklivesmatter #whm #womenshistorymonth

A post shared by Women In Film Los Angeles (@womeninfilmla) on

"Jessie Maple is considered to be the first African American woman to direct an independent feature-length film, after working/training at Channel 13 and Third World Cinema, apprenticing as an editor on films like Shaft’s Big Score (1972), as well as handling camerawork and editing for New York’s ABC, CBS and NBC affiliate TV stations. WILL, shot on location in 1980s Harlem, focuses on Will (played by Obaka Adedunyo), a girls’ basketball coach fighting through a heroin addiction, while mentoring a 12-year-old street kid, adopted by Will and his wife (played by Loretta Devine). WILL, shot on 16mm with a $12,000 budget, centers on Will, a down and out man who is trying to recover from a drug addiction." —@indiewire #52FilmsByWomen #WomensHistoryMonth #WHM #WomenInFilm #WomenDirect #blackhistory #jessiemaple #cinematography #film #blackandwhite #lowbudget #harlem #eighties

A post shared by Women In Film Los Angeles (@womeninfilmla) on