UPDATES

Abortion Healthcare & Resources

June 24, 2022

We are outraged that the Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, undoing 50 years of protections and threatening the lives and livelihoods of millions. We’re turning our collective rage into action, providing the below list of abortion resources offered by employers for those working in the entertainment industry—which will be regularly updated as we receive new information. If your company is offering travel support for healthcare or other abortion-related benefits, please let us know.

“We’re focused right now on ensuring that women and people who can get pregnant who are working in states that are outlawing or have outlawed abortion still have access to safe and legal abortion.”

—WIF CEO Kirsten Schaffer, to TheWrap

What entertainment industry employers are offering:

  • Amazon – Will pay up to $4,000 in travel expenses annually for medical treatments including abortion. [Source]
  • Apple – Health plan covers abortion care and travel costs if necessary. [Source]
  • Buzzfeed – Stipend provided for employees residing in states with abortion trigger laws, covering travel and expenses. [Source]
  • Comcast – Employees’ travel for medical services unavailable near an employee’s home are covered. [Source]
  • Condé Nast – Covered employees and their covered dependents are now eligible for reimbursement on travel and lodging if they cannot locally obtain care for abortion, infertility, or gender-affirming services. [Source]
  • Disney – Travel benefit allowing for “affordable coverage for receiving similar levels of care in another location.” [Source]
  • Endeavor – Out of state care and travel costs for abortions is covered for employees.
  • Google – Employees can apply to relocate to another state without justification. [Source]
  • Live Nation – Covering employees’ travel expenses for out-of-state women’s healthcare services, as well as bail expenses for arrests during peaceful protests. [Source]
  • Meta – Offering travel expense reimbursements for out-of-state reproductive services, to the extent permitted by law. [Source]
  • Netflix – $10,000 lifetime allowance for travel reimbursement for full-time employees and their dependents who need to travel for healthcare including abortion and gender-affirming care. [Source]
  • Paramount – “Certain related travel expenses” will be covered for employees if the covered health service is prohibited in their area. [Source]
  • Riot Games – Support for employees seeking out of state travel costs and potential relocation services.
  • Sony – Travel reimbursement if required to access reproductive healthcare services available under its health plan. [Source]
  • Sundance Film Festival and Sundance Institute – Employee healthcare benefits to include covering travel expenses for services not available where employee resides. [Source]
  • United Talent Agency – Reimbursement for travel expenses for reproductive health services not accessible in an employee’s state of residence. [Source]
  • Warner Bros. Discovery – Has expanded employee healthcare to cover financial support for abortion services. [Source]

Additional resources:

  • Abortion on Our Own Terms: Educational support regarding abortion care and legal information.
  • Apiary: Connecting and providing infrastructure support for abortion funds and other practical support organizations.
  • ARC Southeast: Supporting funding and logistics for those in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Tennessee.
  • The Brigid Alliance: Booking, coordinating, and paying for travel, travel expenses, and child care for those seeking access to an abortion provider.
  • Fund Texas Choice: Pays for Texans’ travel to abortion clinics.
  • I Need an A: Providing simple, up-to-date, localized information for people seeking abortions.
  • Midwest Access Coalition: Helping with travel coordination and costs, lodging, food, medicine, and emotional support for people in the Midwest.
  • Northwest Abortion Access Fund: Supporting access, travel, and lodging for those seeking abortion care in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Alaska.

Don’t Turn Away

Pictured from L–R: HAPPENING star Anamaria Vartolomei, director Audrey Diwan, and moderator Anita Sarkeesian at the WIF screening.

Last month, WIF was honored to host a community screening of HAPPENING, Audrey Diwan‘s devastating, visceral depiction of one young woman’s abortion experience in 1960s France, when that fundamental right was not yet legal in the country. The film is an unflinching look at the incomprehensible lengths that pregnant people must traverse to exercise autonomy over their own bodies. HAPPENING unfolds at an uncomfortably close distance, sometimes, and it refuses to allow viewers the luxury of turning away: turning away from the physical reality of an unwanted pregnancy and its termination, and turning away from the social and cultural burdens that leave so many trapped.

Now more than ever, we must confront those forces that seek to deny pregnant people control over their lives, their bodies, their very selves. We uplift the work of Audrey Diwan and other filmmakers who have told these stories. If you missed some of our past conversations about abortion and reproductive justice, please check them out now:

Renee Bracey Sherman interviews Film Finishing Fund grantee BELLY OF THE BEAST director Erika Cohn, producer Angela Tucker, and subjects Kelli Dixon and Cynthia Chandler.
Lizz Winstead interviews UNPREGNANT writer/director Rachel Lee Goldenberg, producer Sarah Schechter, and executive producers Lucy Kitada and Jessica Switch.
WIF in conversation with NEVER RARELY SOMETIMES ALWAYS director Eliza Hittman and stars Sidney Flanigan and Talia Ryder.
ReFrame Director Andria Wilson Mirza in conversation with PLAN B director Natalie Morales.

Events & Applications

Subscribe to our newsletter to stay up to date with our upcoming virtual events including Laptop Cinema Club, Conversations & Connections, the WIF Speaker Series, and more.

• July 6: Member Workshop: What Now? Marketing & Distributing Your Film
• July 7: Greenlight: Media Execs Talk Shop Storyteller & Above Member Event

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

“The Daily Show with Trevor Noah” with producer Jocelyn Conn, writer Kat Radley, producer Brittany Radocha, supervising producer Elise Terrell, and researcher/assistant to host Chelsea Williamson.
“Shining Girls” creator and showrunner Silka Luisa.
“Minx” with creator/writer/EP Ellen Rapoport, director Rachel Lee Goldenberg, lead actress Ophelia Lovibond, music supervisor Brienne Rose, costume designer Beth Morgan, and actress Idara Victor; moderated by Anita Sarkeesian.

On-Set Sustainability… in the Time of Covid

This guest post is penned by Emellie O’Brien, Founder and CEO of Earth Angel Sustainable Production Services LLC:

It’s safe to say that everyone has had a very long and trying pandemic. The film and television industry is no exception, as you all know. Everyone had to rally to make their departments compliant with the ever-changing on-set COVID rules. This gave Earth Angel the opportunity to collect new tricks of the production sustainability trade while continuously adapting to the “new normal.” Here are our top five tips on how you can do the same:

5 On-Set Sustainability Tips in the Time of COVID-19

  1. Avoid Single-Use Plastic Water Bottles
    While one of our top priorities is always to avoid single-use plastic, we had to rethink our approach to ensure that keeping hydrated is also pandemic-safe.
    1. The first option is to use touchless water dispensers. After you advise your cast and crew to bring their reusable water bottles, everyone can use these dispensers to hydrate sustainably and keep their germs to themselves! We recommend Avalon or the WaterMonster hands-free dispensing kit.
    2. Another option when you really need a single-use alternative is to always have Mananalu Water available on set. It comes in aluminum bottles that are infinitely recyclable, rather than petroleum-based plastics (yuck)!
  2. Have a Foolproof PPE Recycling Set-Up
    In order to avoid the cast and crew’s instincts to throw out their PPE in the general trash when they switch it out or when they’re off for the day, put labeled PPE recycling bins at every waste station and ship your PPE waste to TerraCycle. You won’t regret putting extra time in now to save a lot of waste later.
  3. Green Your Lunch
    1. You can order in! Companies like Deliver Zero and Jybe partner with restaurants prioritizing eco-friendly materials. Yes, please!
    2. Another part of the “new normal” is not being able to eat together. But reusable dishware is still very much a safe and sustainable option, even in a pandemic! Unless explicitly marked sterile, disposable items inevitably have a certain level of bacterial contamination from passing through so many different hands. Disposable items are also more likely to be contaminated from a stranger’s cough than something you already own.
    3. If you do need disposable to-go containers for cast and crew, you’ll want to make sure that the containers are compostable and made out of fiber and bamboo. This is a surefire way to create a low impact lunch on set!
  4. Use Electric Generators
    By using an e-generator instead of a typical one, you’re not only reducing your carbon footprint, but you are also creating a safer space that is helping slow the spread of COVID-19. Since they generate electricity from battery storage rather than burning diesel fuel, this alone increases the surrounding air quality. COVID-19 rates are proven to be higher in places with poor air quality. This is another great way that productions can do their part to help end the pandemic.
  5. Go Paperless!
    We, of course, always recommend going paperless—for obvious reasons—but it’s even more convenient during these times. Here are some great options to avoid wasting paper and spreading germs:
    1. Scriptation is known for having useful tools and features for every production department. Whether you need to annotate scripts or do a file dump, it always comes in handy.
    2. ProductionPro is a great program to use for production collaboration that keeps everyone updated of script changes, schedule changes, and plenty more. There’s nothing better than having an update right in front of you instead of doing yet another re-print.
    3. TiM, a.k.a. Time is Money, is a program that will do a 180 to your crew onboarding paperwork process. Incredible! It comes with preexisting templates for your start paperwork (don’t worry—you can customize your own, too), you can speed up your approval pipeline, you’re able to track the status of everyone’s paperwork in one place, and many more time-saving features.

Now that you have more tools under your belt to improve your on-set sustainability, you can put them to good use and continue to help drive their importance on all of your productions.

Watch our Speaker Series panel on sustainable filmmaking, featuring Earth Angel’s Emellie O’Brien, Tandem Pictures CEO Julie Christeas, and Audrey Vinant-Tang, Senior Manager, Global Sourcing—Energy, ViacomCBS.
See environmental activist Jane Fonda‘s speech as she received the inaugural Jane Fonda Humanitarian Award at the 2021 WIF Honors, presented to her by RuPaul Charles.

#52FilmsByWomen

March 8, 2022

This International Women’s Day, WIF once again encourages you to take on the #52FilmsByWomen challenge. Introduced a few years ago, the basic rules are simple: watch 52 films directed by women within the course of one year. Share about the films you’re watching on social media, using the hashtag #52FilmsByWomen to spread the word, and get more people talking about the women filmmakers that don’t always get attention. You can even browse cinephiles’ lists that they’ve made on Letterboxd, and create your own! Here’s a sample schedule you could follow to watch #52FilmsByWomen before International Women’s Day 2023—this list includes new releases, notable anniversaries, and recent films you may have missed. Let us know what’s on your list on Twitter and Instagram!

  1. Turning Red, directed by Domee Shi
    The first Pixar feature to have a woman holding sole directing credit, this animated film about a Chinese-Canadian teenager who transforms into a giant red panda during puberty debuts on Disney+ on March 11, 2022.
  2. Rescued by Ruby, directed by Katt Shea
    This family-friendly feature debuts on Netflix on March 17, 2022.
  3. Alice, directed by Krystin Ver Linden
    Debuting in the U.S. Dramatic Competition at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, this shocking feature inspired by true events stars Keke Palmer as a woman who escapes slavery to discover that the year is 1973. A theatrical release is scheduled for March 18, 2022.
  4. Cheaper by the Dozen, directed by Gail Lerner
    A new take on the family favorite starring Gabrielle Union, this film debuts on Disney+ on March 18, 2022.
  5. Master, directed by Mariama Diallo
    Another star of the U.S. Dramatic Competition at Sundance, this insidious academia-set film stars Regina Hall and debuts on Prime Video on March 18, 2022.
  6. Umma, directed by Iris K. Shim
    This supernatural horror film boasts Sandra Oh as its star and Sam Raimi as one of its producers, and opens theatrically on March 18, 2022.
  7. Mothering Sunday, directed by Eva Husson
    Based on the novel set in the aftermath of World War I, this film which premiered at Cannes in 2021 will have a limited theatrical release on March 25, 2022.
  8. Along for the Ride, directed by Sofia Alvarez
    This romantic teen drama based on the novel by Sarah Dessen debuts on Netflix on April 22, 2022.
  9. Petite Maman, directed by Céline Sciamma
    This festival favorite French film about a young girl’s grieving process opens theatrically in the U.S. on April 22, 2022.
  10. Hatching (a.k.a. Pahanhautoja), directed by Hanna Bergholm
    This Finnish horror film about a young gymnast with a demanding mother debuted in the MIDNIGHT section at Sundance, and will open in theaters and on VOD on April 29, 2022.
  11. Happening (a.k.a. L’événement), directed by Audrey Diwan
    Winner of the Golden Lion at the 2021 Venice International Film Festival, this film takes place in 1960s France when abortions were illegal. It is scheduled to open theatrically on May 6, 2022.
  12. Cléo from 5 to 7 (a.k.a. Cléo de 5 à 7), directed by Agnès Varda (1962)
    This French New Wave classic celebrates the 60th anniversary of its Cannes Film Festival debut on May 10, 2022. It is available to stream on HBO Max.
  13. Saving Face, directed by Alice Wu (2004)
    In May, which is observed as Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, there are many excellent films from Asian American women directors to include in your film canon. Streaming on Prime Video, this film tells the story of a mother and daughter balancing secrets with tradition.
  14. Shirkers, directed by Sandi Tan (2018)
    In case you missed this unconventional documentary, take this opportunity to stream it on Netflix. Watch the film about Tan’s own time spent making a film in Singapore in 1992, then check out her latest novel, Lurkers.
  15. Watcher, directed by Chloe Okuno
    This thriller that premiered in the U.S. Dramatic Competition at this year’s Sundance will be distributed theatrically and on Shudder on June 3, 2022.
  16. Neptune Frost, directed by Anisia Uzeyman & Saul Williams
    Featured in the Spotlight section at Sundance, this Afrofuturist sci-fi musical with an anticipated June 3, 2022 release date.
  17. Miss Juneteenth, directed by Channing Godfrey Peoples (2020)
    An emotional mother-daughter story centered around a beauty pageant and women’s resilience; streaming on BET+.
  18. Desert Hearts, directed by Donna Deitch (1985)
    Celebrate Pride Month in June by watching one of the first films ever to have a wide release which positively portrays lesbian characters and relationships. Streaming on HBO Max.
  19. A League of Their Own, directed by Penny Marshall (1992)
    On July 1st, celebrate the 30th anniversary of this women’s sports classic starring Geena Davis and Lori Petty; streaming on Peacock.
  20. Crip Camp, directed by Nicole Newnham & James Lebrecht (2020)
    Disability Pride Month is celebrated in July, marking the anniversary of the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in 1990. Watch this documentary on Netflix about how disability rights advocates fought for civil rights legislation.
  21. City of God (a.k.a. Cidade de Deus), directed by Kátia Lund & Fernando Meirelles (2002)
    This Brazilian crime drama turns 20 this year, and is widely critically acclaimed as one of the best films of the 21st Century. Stream it on HBO Max.
  22. Where the Crawdads Sing, directed by Olivia Newman
    Based on the best-selling novel by Delia Owens, this drama starring Normal People‘s Daisy Edgar-Jones opens theatrically on July 22, 2022.
  23. CinemAbility: The Art of Inclusion, directed by Jenni Gold (2012)
    Released 10 years ago on the anniversary of the ADA, this documentary explores portrayals of disability onscreen, and is available to watch on Tubi.
  24. Luck, directed by Peggy Holmes
    Jane Fonda and Whoopi Goldberg star as voice talent in this original animated feature debuting on Apple TV+ on August 5, 2022.
  25. Fast Times at Ridgemont High, directed by Amy Heckerling (1982)
    This icon of coming-of-age teen movies turns 40 on August 13. Stream it on AMC +.
  26. Margarita with a Straw, directed by Shonali Bose (2014)
    This Hindi-language film follows an Indian teenager with cerebral palsy navigating relationships and an understanding of her sexuality. Streaming on Tubi.
  27. The Bride, directed by Jessica M. Thompson
    A gothic horror starring Nathalie Emmanuel, opening theatrically on August 26, 2022.
  28. Harlan County, USA, directed by Barbara Kopple (1976)
    Acknowledge Labor Day with a landmark documentary about a coal miner strike in rural Kentucky that lasts over a year. Streaming on HBO Max.
  29. Honk for Jesus. Save Your Soul. directed by Adamma Ebo
    Featured in the Premieres section of Sundance, this film stars Regina Hall as the first lady of a Southern Baptist church in the aftermath of a scandal. A theatrical and same-day Peacock release is scheduled for September 2, 2022.
  30. Eve’s Bayou, directed by Kasi Lemmons (1997)
    This southern gothic drama, which turns 25 on November 7, has been selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the National Film Registry. It is currently streaming on Tubi.
  31. Whale Rider, directed by Niki Caro (2002)
    First debuting 20 years ago at the Toronto International Film Festival on September 9, 2002, this story of a young Māori girl’s quest to become the chief of her tribe, despite her gender. The film is available to rent.
  32. The Woman King, directed by Gina Prince-Bythewood
    This anticipated historical epic starring Viola Davis as the warrior general of an African kingdom. It is set to open theatrically on September 16, 2022.
  33. Don’t Worry, Darling, directed by Olivia Wilde
    Florence Pugh stars in this upcoming psychological thriller set in the 1950s, opening theatrically on September 23, 2022.
  34. Portrait of Jason, directed by Shirley Clarke (1967)
    This avant-garde, cinéma vérité documentary profiling an enigmatic performer has also been preserved in the National Film Registry. It turns 55 on October 2, and can be viewed on The Criterion Channel.
  35. Near Dark, directed by Kathryn Bigelow (1987)
    On October 3, this vampire horror-noir turns 35; it’s available to stream on MovieSphere.
  36. LaDonna Harris: Indian 101, directed by Julianna Brannum (2014)
    This chronicle of Harris, a Comanche activist and civil rights leader, is told by a Comanche filmmaker—perfect to watch Native stories told by Native voices on Indigenous Peoples Day. It is available to rent.
  37. Patu! directed by Merata Mita (1983)
    A documentary about anti-Apartheid protests directed by Māori filmmaker Mita, this film can be viewed online at NZ On Screen. Mita’s son Heperi Mita documented her work and impact in the film Merata: How Mum Decolonised the Screen, which is on Netflix.
  38. I Like it Like That, directed by Darnell Martin (1994)
    The first film produced by a major film studio to be helmed by an African-American woman director, this Bronx-set film about Afro-Latino characters is available to rent.
  39. Real Women Have Curves, directed by Patricia Cardoso (2002)
    This film adaptation of the stage play turns 20 years old on Novemeber 8, and features the debut of actor America Ferrera. It’s streaming on HBO Max.
  40. Spellbound, directed by Vicky Jenson
    This animated coming-of-age tale is set to debut on Apple TV+ on November 11, 2022.
  41. She Said, directed by Maria Schrader
    Zoe Kazan and Carey Mulligan star as The New York Times journalists Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey who broke the story of Harvey Weinstein’s sexual abuses. It opens theatrically on November 18, 2022.
  42. Trudell, directed by Heather Rae (2005)
    Learn about American Indian poet and activist John Trudell in this documentary from Cherokee filmmaker Rae, which is streaming on IMDbTV.
  43. Lingua Franca, directed by Isabel Sandoval (2019)
    Sandoval wrote, directed, and stars in this film about an undocumented Filipina trans woman working as a caregiver in Brooklyn. Streaming on Netflix.
  44. I Wanna Dance with Somebody, directed by Kasi Lemmons
    Naomi Ackie stars as Whitney Houston in this upcoming biopic releasing on December 21, 2022.
  45. In Between Days (a.k.a. 방황의 날들), directed by So Yong Kim (2007)
    A perfect watch for a winter’s day, this coming-of-age film centers a teenage Korean immigrant adjusting to her new surroundings in Canada. It is available to rent.
  46. Selma, directed by Ava DuVernay (2014)
    A triumph of biographical narrative filmmaking, revisit this film on Martin Luther King Jr. Day in January. It’s available to stream on Paramount+.
  47. Ruby Bridges, directed by Euzhan Palcy (1998)
    The 25th anniversary of this television film’s debut falls on January 18, 2023. Streaming on Disney+.
  48. The Divine Order (a.k.a. Die göttiche Ordnung), directed by Petra Biondina Volpe (2017)
    Learn about women’s fight for the right to vote in 1971 Switzerland from this comedy-drama, available to rent.
  49. Lionheart, directed by Genevieve Nnaji (2018)
    Nnaji herself stars in this film, the first Netflix original film produced in Nigeria.
  50. The Seashell and the Clergyman (a.k.a La Coquille et le clergyman), directed by Germaine Dulac (1928)
    This surrealist experimental French film celebrates its 95th anniversary on February 9, 2023. It is available to watch on YouTube (see below).
  51. The Marvels, directed by Nia DaCosta
    MCU characters Captain Marvel, Ms. Marvel, and Monica Rambeau return in this installment of the superhero franchise, opening theatrically on February 17, 2023.
  52. The Hitch-Hiker, directed by Ida Lupino (1953)
    March 2023 marks the 70th anniversary of this film noir classic, streaming on Prime Video.
The Seashell and the Clergyman

Affinity and Awareness

As the Communications Manager at WIF, I often meet with my colleagues to find out if there are any topics we’d like to cover editorially. One frequent question we bump up against throughout the year is the best way to talk about affinity months. There can be great value in joining in with a chorus of voices while a topic is trending to shine a light on opportunities for distinct communities. But, it can feel performative and perfunctory when we—as individuals with overlapping identities, and as an organization—want to talk about issues affecting people from different backgrounds, with differing abilities, and more all year round!

When I was chatting with a colleague from the WIF Help Line, we struggled with the conundrum of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, April’s designation. Is the goal of this month indeed “awareness”: to remind people of the pervasiveness of this spectrum of crimes? Some groups add the word “prevention” to the SAAPM title, which implies that the purpose is to take action to interrupt the systems that keep assault overlooked and forgiven. Who is charged with raising awareness and taking action? Does the burden to educate, spread awareness, and advocate for prevention fall on the shoulders of those who have been harmed? Why isn’t it called “Survivors Month” or something that uplifts the people affected, instead of focusing on the harm and consequently, defining survivors by their trauma, instead of their resilience?

Ultimately, we’re raising these questions with the hope that actions to prevent sexual violence, as well as care for and celebration of survivors, can become the norm all year long. I want to take this opportunity to remind people about the WIF Help Line, where Advocates are available to speak to anyone working in entertainment who has experienced harassment or misconduct, and to amplify community resources like Peace Over Violence, RAINN, Right to Be‘s bystander intervention training, and Hire Survivors Hollywood. Remember that it is a likely truth that there are survivors in every room, and you never know what someone might be dealing with—respect and understanding should be the default in how we treat the people around us.

—Katherine Spada, WIF Communications Manager

Survivors in Community

I joined WIF as a Help Line Advocate in 2019, a year after getting my Master of Social Work degree. At that point in my life, I wasn’t sure if I wanted to be a therapist, a community organizer, or leave social work altogether to go into human resources. But when I came across the job posting for the WIF Help Line, I was intrigued. As I was still recovering from my own experience of harassment and discrimination in the workplace, I felt called to use my advocacy and social work skills to support the film and television community. I come from an entertainment family and know the challenges of trying to make it in the industry. I felt that with my personal and professional experience, I could support the WIF community in a meaningful way.

As a Help Line Advocate, I answer calls from people in the industry who are seeking support and referrals after experiencing sexual harassment and/or assault. Through this work, I learned that I had to be there for our callers in a way that was respectful of their own individual processes, which are so much more complicated and nuanced than the discussions that were being had in our society as the “Me Too” movement took off. Access to legal support can be important for a survivor or victim of workplace sexual harassment or assault, but it doesn’t address all of the ramifications of working in abusive and toxic environments. Callers share the deep emotional impact that their experiences have had on their sense of identity and the difficulty of being excluded and overlooked in a male dominated industry. Nearly every caller expresses a desire to change the industry culture, and a hope that others will never have to endure a similar experience.

There is strength in numbers, but only if those numbers form a community. I realized that we needed a place for WIF members and Help Line callers to come together and share the knowledge that we are not alone in our experiences of discrimination and abuse. WIF had already sponsored support groups for industry survivors through our partner organization, Wright Institute of Los Angeles (WILA), but the pandemic made it impossible to conduct support groups like we had in the past. We realized that we could go virtual. As a social worker with past experience leading group therapy, and experience as an anti-racist and social justice organizer, I realized I was in the right place at the right time.

Over the past year and a half I have led three Black Member Support Spaces, which focused on healing from racial trauma, two Coping in Quarantine Support Spaces, which focused on coping with personal and professional stressors during the isolation of the pandemic, and the Survivors in Community Support Space, wrapping this month, with survivors of sexual harassment and assault in the entertainment industry. So often in these groups, one member describes their feelings and everyone else emphatically jumps in with “me too.” In a way, this space is a deepened, more healing continuance of the “me too” dialogues that happened on Twitter and elsewhere on the internet.

In these spaces, we often have discussions about loss of trust, including loss of trust in colleagues, friends and family, and the system at large. But as the groups go on, week by week, members begin to heal that loss by building trusting relationships with each other. Members also share and shape their self-care journeys. Just last week in our Survivors in Community Support Space, we discussed non-traditional self-care activities and we got onto the topic how healing dancing can be. I left the session inspired and spent 15 minutes dancing alone in my living room. Next week, we plan on dancing together with our cameras off. Each session looks different, but every discussion is about figuring out members’ needs and how to meet them.

If you want to challenge isolation, connect to your voice, and build community, join the next Survivors in Community Support Space, starting in March. It is an 8-week group for women and non-binary workers who have experienced sexual harassment, assault, and misconduct in the screen industries. The group is limited to eight people so that we can give space to each member’s story. To find out more, please fill out the interest form. I look forward to hearing your story.

Ashley Merriman

Ashley Merriman
Help Line Advocate and Support Space Facilitator

2022 Sundance Film Festival Watchlist

WIF, ReFrame, and IMDbPro are committed to highlighting and uplifting the work of women and non-binary directors, including those featured at the 2022 Sundance Film Festival. Please use this guide to help you plan your screening schedule!

2021–2022 Film Awards and Nominees

The following women have received awards or nominations for their work in cinema throughout the 2021–2022 awards season. List updated regularly.

April 2 & May 6, 2022: 33rd GLAAD Media Awards

  • Outstanding Film – Wide Release: Eternals – Chloé Zhao, director
  • Outstanding Film – Limited Release: Parallel Mothers – Esther García, producer
  • Outstanding Documentary: Changing the Game – Clare Tucker, producer

[Full list of winners, including for television and other categories, available here.]

March 27, 2022: 94th Academy Awards

  • Directing: Jane Campion, The Power of the Dog
  • Lead Actress: Jessica Chastain, The Eyes of Tammy Faye
  • Supporting Actress: Ariana DeBose, West Side Story
  • Adapted Screenplay: Siân Heder, CODA
  • Animated Feature: Encanto – Yvett Merino
  • Original Song: “No Time to Die,” No Time to Die – Billie Eilish
  • Production Design: Dune – Zsuzsanna Sipos
  • Costume Design: Cruella – Jenny Beavan
  • Makeup & Hairstyling: The Eyes of Tammy Faye – Linda Dowds, Stephanie Ingram

March 20, 2022: Writers Guild Awards

  • Adapted Screenplay: CODA, Siân Heder

[Full list of winners, including for television and other categories, available here.]

March 20, 2022: 36th American Society of Cinematographers’ Awards

  • Documentary: Faya Dayi, Jessica Beshir

[Full list of winners, including for television categories, available here.]

March 19, 2022: 33rd Producers Guild Awards

  • Award for Outstanding Producer of Animated Theatrical Motion Pictures: Encanto – Yvett Merino

[Full list of winners, including for television categories, available here.]

March 19, 2022: 58th Cinema Audio Society Awards

  • Motion Pictures – Documentary: Summer of Soul (…Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised) – Emily Strong, production mixer

March 15, 2022: National Board of Review Awards

  • Best Film: Licorice Pizza – Sara Murphy, producer
  • Best Actress: Rachel Zegler, West Side Story
  • Best Supporting Actress: Aunjanue Ellis, King Richard
  • Breakthrough Performance: Alana Haim, Licorice Pizza
  • Best Animated Feature: Encanto – Yvett Merino, producer
  • Best Ensemble: The Harder They Fall – Zazie Beetz, Regina King, Danielle Deadwyler
  • NBR Freedom of Expression Award: Flee – Monica Hellström, Signe Byrge Sørensen, Charlotte De La Gournerie, producers
  • Top Films
    • Belfast – Laura Berwick, Becca Kovacik, Tamar Thomas, producers
    • Dune – Mary Parent, producer
    • The Tragedy of Macbeth – Frances McDormand, producer
    • West Side Story – Kristie Macosko Krieger, producer
  • Top Foreign Language Films
    • Lamb – Zuzanna Hencz, Sara Nassim, Klaudia Śmieja-Rostworowska, producers
    • Lingui, The Sacred Bonds – Florence Stern, producer
    • Titane – Julia Ducournau, director
    • The Worst Person in the World – Andrea Berentsen Ottmar, producer
  • Top Documentaries
    • Ascension – Jessica Kingdon, director/producer; Kira Simon-Kennedy, producer
    • Attica – Traci A. Curry, director/producer
    • Flee – Monica Hellström, Signe Byrge Sørensen, Charlotte De La Gournerie, producers
    • The Rescue – Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi, director/producer
    • Roadrunner: A Film About Anthony Bourdain – Caitrin Rogers, producer
  • Top Independent Films
    • The Card Counter – Lauren Mann, producer
    • C’mon C’mon – Chelsea Barnard, Lila Yacoub, Andrea Longacre-White, producers
    • CODA – Siân Heder, director
    • The Green Knight – Theresa Steele Page, producer
    • Holler – Nicole Riegel, director; Rachel Gould, Katie McNeill, Christy Spitzer Thornton, producers
    • Jockey – Nancy Schafer, producer
    • Pig – Vanessa Block, Dimitra Tsingou, Dori A. Rath, producers
    • Shiva Baby – Emma Seligman, director; Katie Schiller, Lizzie Shapiro, producers
    • The Souvenir Part II – Joanna Hogg, director/producer; Emma Norton, producer

March 13, 2022: BAFTA Film Awards

  • Best Film: The Power of the Dog – Jane Campion, Tanya Seghatchian
  • Outstanding British Film: Belfast – Laura Berwick, Becca Kovacik, Tamar Thomas
  • Animated Film: Encanto – Yvett Merino
  • Director: The Power of the Dog, Jane Campion
  • Adapted Screenplay: CODA, Siân Heder
  • Leading Actress: Joanna Scanlan, After Love
  • Supporting Actress: Ariana DeBose, West Side Story
  • Casting: West Side Story – Cindy Tolan
  • Production Design: Dune – Zsuzsanna Sipos
  • Costume Design: Cruella, Jenny Beavan
  • Make Up & Hair: The Eyes of Tammy Faye – Linda Dowds, Stephanie Ingram
  • British Short Film: The Black Cop – Cherish Oteka
  • EE Rising Star Award: Lashana Lynch

March 13, 2022: 27th Critics Choice Awards

  • Best Picture: The Power of the Dog – Jane Campion, director, producer; Tanya Seghatchian, producer
  • Best Director: Jane Campion, The Power of the Dog
  • Best Adapted Screenplay: Jane Campion, The Power of the Dog
  • Best Actress: Jessica Chastain, The Eyes of Tammy Faye
  • Best Supporting Actress: Ariana DeBose, West Side Story
  • Best Acting Ensemble: Belfast – Caitríona Balfe, Judi Dench
  • Best Cinematography: Ari Wegner, The Power of the Dog
  • Best Production Design: Dune, Zsuzsanna Sipos
  • Best Editing: West Side Story, Sarah Broshar
  • Best Costume Design: Cruella, Jenny Beavan
  • Best Hair and Makeup: The Eyes of Tammy Faye – Linda Dowds, Stephanie Ingram
  • Best Comedy: Licorice Pizza – Sara Murphy, producer
  • Best Song: “No Time to Die,” No Time to Die – Billie Eilish

[Full list of winners, including for television categories, available here.]

March 13, 2022: 69th Motion Picture Sound Editors’ Golden Reel Awards

  • Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Feature Animation: Raya and the Last Dragon – Nia Hansen, sound designer; Shelley Roden MPSE, foley artist
  • Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Feature Documentary: The Rescue – Deborah Wallach, supervising sound editor
  • Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Foreign Language Feature: Cliff Walkers – Zhao Nan MPSE, supervising sound editor; Ann Scibelli, Zio’ou Olivia Zhang MPSE, sound editors
  • Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Feature Dialogue / ADR: Nightmare Alley – Jill Purdy MPSE, supervising sound editor, supervising dialogue editor, supervising ADR editor
  • Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Feature Effects / Foley: Dune – Sandra Fox, foley artist
  • Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Student Film (Verna Fields Award): Build Me Up – Wong Hui Grace, supervising sound editor

[Full list of winners, including for television and other categories, available here.]

March 12, 2022: 74th Directors Guild Awards

  • Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Theatrical Feature Film: The Power of the Dog, Jane Campion
  • Outstanding Directorial Achievement of a First-Time Feature Film Director: The Lost Daughter, Maggie Gyllenhaal

Full list of winners, including for television categories, here.

March 12, 2022: 49th Annie Awards

  • Independent Feature: Flee – Monica Hellström, Signe Byrge Sørensen, Charlotte de La Gournerie, producers
  • Voice Acting, Feature: Abbi Jacobson, The Mitchells vs. The Machines
  • Character Design, Feature: The Mitchells vs. The Machines, Lindsey Olivares
  • Production Design, Feature: The Mitchells vs. The Machines, Lindsey Olivares
  • Music, Feature: Encanto, Germaine Franco’
  • Student Film: Night of the Living Dread – Ida Melum, director; Danielle Goff, producer
  • Winsor McCay Award: Lillian Schwartz

[Full list of winners, including for television and other categories, available here.]

March 11, 2022: AFI Awards

  • Movies of the Year
    • CODA – Siân Heder, director
    • Dune – Mary Parent, producer
    • Licorice Pizza – Sara Murphy, producer
    • The Power of the Dog – Jane Campion, director, producer; Tanya Seghatchian, producer
    • tick, tick… BOOM! – Julie Oh, producer
    • The Tragedy of Macbeth – Frances McDormand, producer
    • West Side Story – Krystie Macosko Krieger, producer

For AFI’s television programs of the year, click here.

March 9, 2022: 24th Costume Designers Guild Awards

  • Excellence in Sci-Fi/Fantasy Film: Dune – Jacqueline West
  • Excellence in Contemporary Film: Coming 2 America – Ruth E. Carter
  • Excellence in Period Film: Cruella – Jenny Beavan

[Full list of winners, including for television and other categories, available here.]

March 8: 2022: 3rd Society of Composers & Lyricists Awards

  • Outstanding Original Score for a Studio Film: Encanto, Germaine Franco
  • Outstanding Original Song for a Musical/Comedy: “Just Look Up” from Don’t Look Up, Ariana Grande, Taura Stinson
  • Outstanding Original Song for a Drama/Documentary: “No Time to Die” from No Time to Die, Billie Eilish

[Full list of winners, including for television and other categories, available here.]

March 8, 2022: Visual Effects Society Awards

  • Outstanding Animated Character in an Animated Feature: Encanto, Mirabel Madrigal – Kelly McClanahan, Mary Twohig
  • Outstanding Created Environment in a Photoreal Feature: Spider-Man: No Way Home, The Mirror Dimension – Claire Le Teuff
  • Outstanding Created Environment in an Animated Feature: Encanto, Antonio’s Room – Camille Andre
  • Outstanding Model in a Photoreal or Animated Project: Dune, Royal Ornithopter – Anna Yamazoe, Rachael Dunk
  • Outstanding Effects Simulation in an Animated Feature: Raya and the Last Dragon – Le Joyce Tong
  • Outstanding Visual Effects in a Student Project: Green – Camille Poiriez, Arielle Cohen, Eloise Thibault

[Full list of winners, including for television and other categories, available here.]

March 6, 2022: 37th Film Independent Spirit Awards

  • Best Feature: The Lost Daughter – Maggie Gyllenhaal, director, producer; Osnat Handelsman-Keren, Talia Kleinhendler, producers
  • Best Director: Maggie Gyllenhaal, The Lost Daughter
  • Best First Feature: 7 Days – Liz Cardenas, Mel Eslyn, producers
  • Best Female Lead: Taylour Paige, Zola
  • Best Supporting Female: Ruth Negga, Passing
  • Best Screenplay:The Lost Daughter, Maggie Gyllenhaal
  • Best First Screenplay: Pig – Story by Vanessa Block
  • Best Editing: Zola, Joi McMillon
  • Truer Than Fiction Award: Faya Dayi – Jessica Beshir
  • John Cassavetes Award: Shiva Baby – Emma Seligman, director, producer, writer; Katie Schiller, Lizzie Shapiro, producers
  • Producers Award: Lizzie Shapiro
  • Robert Altman Award – The Director, Cast, and Casting Director of Mass, including casting by Allison Estrin and actors Martha Plimpton, Ann Dowd, Michelle N. Carter, and Breeda Wool

[Full list of winners, including for television series, available here.]

March 5, 2022: 26th Art Directors Guild Awards

  • Period Feature Film: Nightmare Alley, Tamara Deverell
  • Animated Feature Film: Encanto, Lorelay Bové

[Full list of winners, including for television categories, available here.]

March 5, 2022: 72nd ACE Eddie Awards

  • Best Edited Feature Film (Dramatic): King Richard, Pamela Martin

[Full list of winners, including for television and other categories, available here.]

March 4, 2022: 37th International Documentary Association (IDA) Awards

  • Best Feature: Flee – Monica Hellström, Signe Byrge Sørensen, Charlotte De La Gournerie, producers
  • Best Cinematography: Faya Dayi, Jessica Beshir
  • Pioneer Award: Jean Tsien
  • Courage Under Fire Award: Rintu Thomas, Writing With Fire
  • Pare Lorentz Award: The First Wave – Jenna Millman, Leslie Norville, producers
    • Honorable Mention: Tigre Gente – Elizabeth Unger, director/producer; Joanna Natasegara, producer
  • Emerging Documentary Filmmaker Award: Cecilia Aldarondo
  • David L. Wolper Student Documentary Award: Seahorse – Nele Dehnenkamp, director/producer; Chirstine Duttlinger, producer

[Full list of winners, including for episodic and other categories, available here.]

March 2, 2022: 13th African American Film Critics Association (AAFCA) Awards

  • Best Actress: Jennifer Hudson, Respect
  • Best Supporting Actress: Aunjanue Ellis, King Richard
  • Breakout Actor: Saniyya Sidney, King Richard
  • Best Ensemble: The Harder They Fall
  • Best Independent Feature: Who We Are: A Chronicle of Racism in America – Emily Kunstler, Sarah Kunstler, directors/producers; Vanessa Hope, producer
  • The Stanley Kramer Award for Social Justice: Attica Co-Director Traci Curry
  • Building Change Award: Roxanne Avent-Taylor, The Hidden Empire Film Group

February 27, 2022: 28th Screen Actors Guild Awards

  • Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role: Jessica Chastain, The Eyes of Tammy Faye
  • Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role: Ariana DeBose, West Side Story
  • Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture: CODA – Emilia Jones, Marlee Matlin
  • Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble in a Motion Picture: No Time to Die
  • Lifetime Achievement Award: Helen Mirren

[Full list of winners, including for television series, available here.]

February 26, 2022: NAACP Image Awards

  • Entertainer of the Year: Jennifer Hudson
  • Outstanding Actress in a Motion Picture: Jennifer Hudson, Respect
  • Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture: Regina King, The Harder They Fall
  • Outstanding Independent Motion Picture: CODA – Siân Heder, director
  • Outstanding Documentary (Film): Barbara Lee: Speaking Truth to Power – Abby Ginzberg, director; Joslyn Rose Lyons, producer
  • Outstanding Ensemble Cast in a Motion Picture: The Harder They Fall – Zazie Beetz, Regina King, Danielle Deadwyler
  • Outstanding Animated Motion Picture: Encanto – Charise Castro-Smith, co-director; Yvett Merino, producer
  • Outstanding Character Voice-Over Performance – Motion Picture: Letitia Wright, Sing 2
  • Outstanding Short-Form (Live Action): When the Sun Sets – Phumi Morare, director; Christine H. Cho, producer

[Full list of winners, including for television and other categories, available here.]

February 26, 2022: 34th USC Libraries Scripter Awards

Film Adaptation: The Lost Daughter by Maggie Gyllenhaal, based on the novel by Elena Ferrante

February 6, 2022: London Critics’ Circle Film Awards

  • Film of the Year: The Power of the Dog – Jane Campion, director, producer; Tanya Seghatchian, producer
  • Director of the Year: Jane Campion, The Power of the Dog
  • Actress of the Year: Olivia Colman, The Lost Daughter
  • Supporting Actress of the Year: Ruth Negga, Passing
  • British/Irish Actress of the Year (for Body of Work): Tilda Swinton, Memoria, The Souvenir: Part II, The French Dispatch
  • The Attenborough Award: British/Irish Film of the Year: The Souvenir: Part II – Joanna Hogg, director, producer; Emma Norton, producer
  • The Philip French Award: Breakthrough British/Irish Filmmaker: Rebecca Hall, Passing

[Full list of nominees, including for television series, available here.]

January 9, 2022: 79th Golden Globe Awards

  • Best Motion Picture, Drama: The Power of the Dog – Jane Campion, director, producer; Tanya Seghatchian, producer
  • Best Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy: West Side Story – Kristie Macosko Krieger, producer
  • Best Director, Motion Picture: Jane Campion, The Power of the Dog
  • Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture, Drama: Nicole Kidman, Being the Ricardos
  • Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy: Rachel Zegler, West Side Story
  • Best Supporting Actress, Motion Picture: Ariana DeBose, West Side Story
  • Best Motion Picture, Animated: Encanto – Yvett Merino, producer
  • Best Original Song, Motion Picture: “No Time to Die,” No Time to Die, Billie Eilish

[Full list of winners, including for television series, available here.]

January 8, 2022: National Society of Film Critics Awards

  • Best Actress: Penélope Cruz, Parallel Mothers
  • Best Supporting Actress: Ruth Negga, Passing
  • Best Nonfiction Film: Flee – Monica Hellstrøm, Signe Byrge Sørensen, producers

January 7, 2022: 22nd AFI Awards

  • AFI Movies of the Year
    • CODA – Siân Heder, director
    • Dune – Mary Parent, producer
    • Licorice Pizza – Sara Murphy, producer
    • The Power of the Dog – Jane Campion, director, producer; Tanya Seghatchian, producer
    • tick, tick… BOOM! – Julie Oh, producer
    • The Tragedy of Macbeth – Frances McDormand, producer
    • West Side Story – Kristie Macosko Krieger, producer
  • AFI Special Award
    • Belfast – Laura Berwick, Becca Kovacik, Tamar Thomas, producers

[Full list of winners, including for television series, available here.]

December 15, 2021: Chicago Film Critics Association Awards

  • Best Picture: The Power of the Dog – Jane Campion, director, producer; Tanya Seghatchian, producer
  • Best Director: Jane Campion, The Power of the Dog
  • Best Actress: Kristen Stewart, Spencer
  • Best Supporting Actress: Ruth Negga, Passing
  • Best Adapted Screenplay: The Power of the Dog, Jane Campion
  • Best Animated Film: Flee – Monica Hellstrøm, Signe Byrge Sørensen, producers
  • Best Art Direction/Production Design: The French Dispatch – Rena DeAngelo, set decorator
  • Best Cinematography: The Power of the Dog, Ari Wegner
  • Best Costume Design: Spencer, Jacqueline Durran
  • Most Promising Performer: Alana Haim, Licorice Pizza

November 29, 2021: 31st Gotham Awards

  • Best Feature: The Lost Daughter – Maggie Gyllenhaal, director; Osnat Handelsman Keren, Talia Kleinhendler, Maggie Gyllenhaal, producers
  • Best Documentary Feature: Flee – Monica Hellstrøm, Signe Byrge Sørensen, Charlotte De La Gournerie, producers
  • Bingham Ray Breakthrough Director Award: Maggie Gyllenhaal, The Lost Daughter
  • Best Screenplay: The Lost Daughter, Maggie Gyllenhaal
  • Outstanding Lead Performance: Olivia Colman, The Lost Daughter (tie)
  • Breakthrough Performer: Emilia Jones, CODA
  • Director’s Tribute: Jane Campion
  • Performer Tribute: Kristen Stewart
  • Ensemble Tribute: the cast of The Harder They Fall, including Zazie Beetz, Danielle Deadwyler, and Regina King
  • Icon Tribute: Kathleen Collins

[Full list of winners, including for television series, available here.]

September 18, 2021: 46th Toronto International Film Festival Awards

  • People’s Choice Documentary Award: The Rescue, E. Chai Vasarhelyi
  • People’s Choice Midnight Madness Award: Titane, Julia Ducournau
  • TIFF Tribute Actor Awards: Jessica Chastain, The Eyes of Tammy Faye
  • Special Tribute Award: Dionne Warwick, Dionne Warwick: Don’t Make Me Over
  • TIFF Emerging Talent Award: Danis Goulet, Night Raiders
  • Platform Prize: Yuni, Kamila Andini
  • Jeff Skoll Award in Impact Media: Alanis Obomsawin
  • Shawn Mendes Foundation Changemaker Award: Scarborough, Shasha Nakhai
  • Amplify Voices Award for Best Canadian Feature Film: Ste. Anne, Rhayne Vermette
  • Amplify Voices Award: A Night of Knowing Nothing, Payal Kapadia
  • TIFF Variety Artisan Award: Cinematographer Ari Wegner, The Power of the Dog
  • IMDbPro Short Cuts Share Her Journey Award: Astel, Ramata-Toulaye Sy

September 11, 2021: 78th Venice International Film Festival Awards

  • Golden Lion: Happening, Audrey Diwan
  • Silver Lion for Best Director: The Power of the Dog, Jane Campion
  • Best Actress: Penélope Cruz, Parallel Mothers
  • Best Screenplay: The Lost Daughter, Maggie Gyllenhaal

WIF Stands in Solidarity with IATSE

September 27, 2021

We, the undersigned, support the protection of workers and their rights to safe workplaces, reasonable work hours and rest, and living wages. As advocates of people underrepresented and under-protected in the entertainment industry, it is imperative that we uphold safe and regenerative working conditions, especially as we all continue to weather the strain of the COVID-19 pandemic.

We encourage anyone who considers themselves a champion for representation and justice to stand with us in support of Hollywood crew members. Read and sign on to IATSE’s petition for a fair deal, and continue to support organizations fighting to make our industry safer for all people.

The Blackhouse Foundation
Brown Girls Doc Mafia
Film Fatales
Muslim Public Affairs Council – Hollywood Bureau (MPAC)

New York Women in Film and Television (NYWIFT)
Pop Culture Collaborative
Sundance Institute
Think Tank for Inclusion and Equity (TTIE)

Visual Communications
WIF (Women In Film)

2021 Emmy Winners

WIF congratulates the women who have taken home the Television Academy’s top honors at this year’s Emmy Awards!

Governors Award

Debbie Allen

Outstanding Comedy Series

“Ted Lasso”: Liza Katzer, Co-Executive Producer; Jane Becker, Supervising Producer; Jamie Lee, Supervising Producer; Tina Pawlik, Produced by

Outstanding Competition Program

“RuPaul’s Drag Race”: Mandy Salangsang, Executive Producer; Michele Mills, Executive Producer; Zoe Jackson, Co-Executive Producer; Lisa Steele, Co-Executive Producer; Michelle Visage, Producer; Alicia Gargaro-Magaña, Producer; Jen Passovoy, Supervising Producer

Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series

“Hacks” (There Is No Line [Pilot]): Lucia Aniello, Directed by

Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series

“The Crown” (War): Jessica Hobbs, Directed by

Outstanding Drama Series

“The Crown”: Suzanne Mackie, Executive Producer; Oona O’Beirn, Producer

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series

Jean Smart as Deborah Vance, “Hacks”

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series

Olivia Colman as Queen Elizabeth II, “The Crown”

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited or Anthology Series or Movie

Kate Winslet as Mare Sheehan, “Mare of Easttown”

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series

Hannah Waddingham as Rebecca Welton, “Ted Lasso”

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series

Gillian Anderson as Margaret Thatcher, “The Crown”

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited or Anthology Series or Movie

Julianne Nicholson as Lori Ross, “Mare of Easttown”

Outstanding Variety Sketch Series

“Saturday Night Live”: Lindsay Shookus, Producer; Erin Doyle, Producer; Caroline Maroney, Producer

Outstanding Variety Special (Live)

“Stephen Colbert’s Election Night 2020: Democracy’s Last Stand Building Back America Great Again Better 2020”: Tanya Michnevich Bracco, Co-Executive Producer; Denise Rehrig, Co-Executive Producer; Emily Gertler, Supervising Producer; Sara Vilkomerson, Supervising Producer; Paige Kendig, Producer

Outstanding Variety Special (Pre-Recorded)

“Hamilton”: Jill Furman, Executive Producer; Maggie Brohn, Executive Producer

Outstanding Variety Talk Series

“Last Week Tonight with John Oliver”: Liz Stanton, Executive Producer; Laura L. Griffin, Producer; Kate Mullaney, Producer; Catherine Owens, Producer; Marian Wang, Producer

Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series

“Hacks” (There Is No Line [Pilot]): Lucia Aniello, Written by; Jen Statsky

Outstanding Writing for a Limited or Anthology Series or Movie

“I May Destroy You”: Michaela Coel, Written by

Outstanding Writing for a Variety Series

“Last Week Tonight with John Oliver”: Ali Barthwell, Liz Hynes, Joanna Rothkopf, Chrissy Shackelford, Seena Vali, Writers

Creative Arts Emmys

Actress in a Short Form Comedy or Drama Series

“Keke Palmer’s Turnt Up with the Taylors”: Keke Palmer as Barbie / Gammy Tay / Lil Thad / Miranda / Rick

Casting for a Comedy Series

“Ted Lasso”: Theo Park, Casting by

Casting for a Limited or Anthology Series or Movie

“The Queen’s Gambit”: Ellen Lewis, Casting by; Kate Sprance, Casting by; Olivia Scott-Webb, Casting by; Tina Gerussi, Location Casting; Anna-Lena Slater, Location Casting; Tatjana Moutchnik, Location Casting; Stephanie Maile, Location Casting

Casting for a Reality Program

“RuPaul’s Drag Race”: Goloka Bolte, Casting by

Character Voice-Over Performance

“Big Mouth” (A Very Special 9/11 Episode): Maya Rudolph as Connie the Hormone Monstress

Contemporary Costumes

“Pose” (Series Finale): Analucia McGorty, Costume Designer; Michelle Roy, Assistant Costume Designer; Linda Giammarese, Costume Supervisor

Contemporary Hairstyling

“Pose” (Series Finale): Tene Wilder, Hairstylist; Lisa Thomas, Hairstylist

Contemporary Hairstyling for a Variety, Nonfiction, or Reality Program

“Saturday Night Live” (Host: Maya Rudolph): Jodi Mancuso, Department Head Hairstylist; Cara Hannah, Key Hairstylist; Inga Thrasher, Hairstylist; Amanda Duffy Evans, Hairstylist; Gina Ferrucci, Hairstylist

Contemporary Makeup (Non-Prosthetic)

“Pose” (Series Finale): Sherri Berman Laurence, Department Head Makeup Artist; Nicky Pattison Illum, Key Makeup Artist; Jessica Padilla, Additional Makeup Artist; Jennifer Suarez, Additional Makeup Artist

Choreography for Scripted Programming

Dolly Parton’s Christmas on the Square: Debbie Allen, Choreographer

Contemporary Makeup for a Variety, Nonfiction, or Reality Program (Non-Prosthetic)

“Saturday Night Live” (Host: Elon Musk): Amy Tagliamonti, Key Makeup Artist; Kim Weber, Makeup Artist; Joanna Pisani, Key Makeup Artist; Young Beck, Key Makeup Artist

Costumes for a Variety, Nonfiction, or Reality Program

  • Black Is King: Zerina Akers, Costume Designer
  • “The Masked Singer” (Super 8 – The Plot Chickens! Part 2): Marina Toybina, Costume Designer; Grainne O’Sullivan, Costume Supervisor; Gabrielle Letamendi, Assistant Costume Designer; Lucia Maldonado, Assistant Costume Designer
  • Sherman’s Showcase Black History Month Spectacular: Ariyela Wald-Cohain, Costume Designer; Patty Malkin, Costume Supervisor; Erica Schwartz, Assistant Costume Supervisor

Directing for a Documentary/Nonfiction Program

Dick Johnson Is Dead: Kirsten Johnson, Directed by

Documentary or Nonfiction Special

Boys State: Laurene Powell Jobs, Executive Producer; Nicole Stott, Executive Producer; Shannon Dill, Co-Executive Producer; Amanda McBaine, Producer

Exceptional Merit in Documentary Filmmaking

76 Days: Pluto: Jean Tsien, Produced by

Fantasy/Sci-Fi Costumes

“WandaVision” (Filmed Before a Live Studio Audience): Virginia Burton, Costume Supervisor

Guest Actress in a Comedy Series

“Saturday Night Live”: Maya Rudolph as Host

Guest Actress in a Drama Series

“The Crown” (48:1): Claire Foy as Queen Elizabeth II

Hosted Nonfiction Series or Special

“Stanley Tucci: Searching for Italy”: Eve Kay, Executive Producer; Amy Entelis, Executive Producer; Molly Harrington, Supervising Producer

Main Title Design

“The Good Lord Bird”: Abigail Fairfax, Illustrator/Animator

Music Supervision

“I May Destroy You” (Ego Death): Ciara Elwis, Music Supervisor

Original Music and Lyrics

“WandaVision”: Kristen Anderson-Lopez, Music & Lyrics

Outstanding Unstructured Reality Program

“RuPaul’s Drag Race Untucked”: San Heng, Executive Producer; Mandy Salangsang, Executive Producer; Jen Passovoy, Supervising Producer

Period and/or Character Hairstyling

“Bridgerton” (Art of the Swoon): Lynda J. Pearce, Assistant Department Head Hairstylist; Claire Matthews, Hairstylist; Tania Couper, Hairstylist

Period Costumes

“The Queen’s Gambit” (End Game): Gabriele Binder, Costume Designer; Gina Krauss, Assistant Costume Designer; Katrin Hoffmann, Assistant Costume Designer; Nanrose Buchmann, Assistant Costume Designer; Sparka Lee Hall, Costume Supervisor

Picture Editing for a Structured Reality or Competition Program

“RuPaul’s Drag Race” (Condragulations): Jamie Martin, Lead Editor

Picture Editing for an Unstructured Reality Program

“Life Below Zero” (The Other Side): Jennifer Nelson, Additional Editor

Picture Editing for Variety Programming

“A Black Lady Sketch Show” (Sister, May I Call You Oshun?): Daysha Broadway, Supervising Editor; Stephanie Filo, Editor; Jessica Hernández, Editor

Production Design for a Narrative Period or Fantasy Program (One Hour or More)

“The Queen’s Gambit”: Kai Karla Koch, Art Director; Sabine Schaaf, Set Decorator

Production Design for a Narrative Program (Half-Hour)

“WandaVision”: Sharon Davis, Art Director; Kathy Orlando, Set Decorator

Production Design for a Variety, Reality, or Competition Series

“Saturday Night Live” (Host: Kristen Wiig): Melissa Shakun, Art Director

Production Design for a Variety Special

“The Oscars”: Alana Billingsley, Art Director

Prosthetic Makeup

“The Mandalorian” (Chapter 13: The Jedi): Samantha Ward, Makeup Artist

Short Form Comedy, Drama, or Variety Series

“Carpool Karaoke: The Series”: Sheila Rogers, Supervising Producer; Diana Miller, Producer

Short Form Nonfiction or Reality Series

“Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man”: Morolake Akinosun, Producer

Single-Camera Picture Editing for a Limited or Anthology Series or Movie

“The Queen’s Gambit” (Exchanges): Michelle Tesoro, ACE, Editor

Sound Editing for a Comedy or Drama Series (Half-Hour) and Animation

“Love, Death + Robots” (Snow in the Desert): Dawn Lunsford, Foley Editor; Alicia Stevens, Foley Artist

Sound Editing for a Comedy or Drama Series (One Hour)

“Lovecraft Country” (Sundown): Paula Fairfield, Sound Designer

Sound Editing for a Limited or Anthology Series, Movie, or Special

“The Queen’s Gambit” (End Game): Mary-Ellen Porto, Sound Editor; Rachel Chancey, Foley Artist

Sound Mixing for a Comedy or Drama Series (One Hour)

“The Mandalorian” (Chapter 13: The Jedi): Bonnie Wild, Re-Recording Mixer; Shawn Holden, CAS, Production Mixer

Special Visual Effects in a Season or Movie

“The Mandalorian”: Abbigail Keller, Visual Effects Producer

Special Visual Effects in a Single Episode

“Star Trek: Discovery” (Su’kal): Aleksandra Kochoska, VFX Producer; Kristen Prahl, VFX Producer Ghost VFX; Leslie Chung, VFX Supervisor Crafty Apes

Structured Reality Program

“Queer Eye”: Jennifer Lane, Executive Producer; Jordana Hochman, Executive Producer; Rachelle Mendez, Executive Producer

Technical Direction, Camerawork, Video Control for a Special

Hamilton: Abby Levine, Video Control

Writing for a Nonfiction Program

The Social Dilemma: Vickie Curtis, Written by

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